28 June 2012

Forgotten Book: WAR CRIMES, Peter Carey

For many of my contributions this year to Pattinase's Friday's Forgotten Books
I am focussing on the books I read 20 years ago in 1992. By then my reading diet was almost exclusively crime fiction.

So my recent posts for this meme have largely been about authors that I "discovered" in that year.

My choice this week is WAR CRIMES by Australian author Peter Carey. Published by University of Queensland Press in 1979, this was a collection of 13 short stories, described as bizarre, funny and chilling. 
I read it towards the end of 1992.

The Journey of a Lifetime
"Do You Love Me?" (previously published in Tabloid Story)
The Uses of Williamson Wood
The Last Days of a Famous Mime (previously published in Stand)
A Schoolboy Prank
The Chance
Fragrance of Roses (previously published in Nation Review)
The Puzzling Nature of Blue
Ultra-Violet Light
Kristu-Du
He Found Her in Late Summer
Exotic Pleasures
War Crimes

It seems that if you have a first edition copy now you may be sitting on a little gold mine.

You may know of Peter Carey from his novels.

Bliss (1981)
Illywhacker (1985)
Oscar and Lucinda (1988)
The Tax Inspector (1991)
The Unusual Life of Tristan Smith (1994)
The Big Bazoohley (1995)
Jack Maggs (1997)
True History of the Kelly Gang (2000)
My Life as a Fake (2003)
Theft (2006)
His Illegal Self (2008)
Parrot and Olivier in America (2010)
The Chemistry of Tears (2012)

Peter Carey's website.


4 comments:

Maxine Clarke said...

test

Margot Kinberg said...

Kerrie - I hadn't heard he had a collection of stories. Thanks! Something I should look for...

Irene said...

I'm not at all familiar, but then again that's why I visit you, you keep me in the "know". Are you sitting on a gold mine?

LauraR said...

Interesting to go back 20 years in time! I was only 15 then, so my taste was very much within the typical crime obsessive trajectory, of Agatha Christie/Ruth Rendell/Conan Doyle. Think I would have grown out of Nancy Drew by then!

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